Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue

Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue americhicks
Ross Izzard of the Independence Institute joins Kim to discuss the battle over freedom of school choice in the Supreme Court case, Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue.

Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue and the fight for freedom of school choice

Ross Izzard of the Independence Institute joins Kim to discuss Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, which is slated to be judged by the Supreme Court. The case—championed by the Institute of Justice and the Cato Institute—will have long-reaching consequnces for freedom of choice in education in the United States.

The Cato Institute offers a brief summary of the legal issue the Supreme Court must settle: “laine Amendments — adopted by many states starting in the late 1800s as an anti-Catholic measure — prevent states from using public funding for religious education. Thirty-seven states currently have the amendments, and some courts have interpreted them excluding religious options from state school-choice programs — that is, preventing access to otherwise publicly available benefits purely on the basis of religion. In other words, Blaine Amendments let some states practice religious discrimination.

Montana created a program where people who donated to private-school funding organizations received tax credits. The program both encouraged school choice and allowed people to spend their own money how they saw fit. However, the Montana Department of Revenue used the state’s Blaine Amendment to exclude those donors whose money found its way to religious private schools, and, at the same time, it allowed non-religious private-school donors to benefit. During the ensuing legal challenge, the Montana Supreme Court not only ruled against the religious families that challenged the discrimination, it struck down the entire program, meaning both religious and non-religious donors wouldn’t receive tax credits.”

For further reading on this subject, please read Izzard’s July 8th article on The Federalist as well as his June 28 article for the Independence Institute.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on pinterest
Pinterest

The Search for Alexander “Sandy” Bonnyman Jr.

Clay Bonnyman Evans’ grandfather, Alexander “Sandy” Bonnyman Jr. (May 2, 1910 – November 22, 1943) was a United States Marine Corps officer who was killed in action on Betio Atoll in the Gilbert Islands during World War II. Sandy Bonnyman’s bones lay buried under the sand of Tarawa for over 70 years.

The Amazing Story of Augusta Chiwy

Military historian and author Martin King joins Kim to share the story of Augusta Chiwy and his own story as he sought to find her decades after the end of World War II.

WWII Veteran Frank DeVita

WWII Veteran Frank DeVita joined the Coast Guard to serve our country. He ended up as a ramp operator on a Higgins Boat landing craft on the first wave of soldiers landing at Omaha Beach in Normandy on D-Day.

WWII Veteran Richard Rohleder

Kansas farmboy and WWII Veteran, Richard Rohleder, recently traveled back to the Netherlands for the 75th anniversary of Operation Market Garden.

Edward Snowden’s Permanent Record

In the Age of Information, data is power. Susan Kochevar reviews National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden’s book, Permanent Record.

Healing Our Wounded Warriors

Vietnam veterans Grady Birdsong and Colonel Bob Fischer discuss the powerful healing methods being employed to treat veterans with PTSD.

Leave a Reply

avatar
  Subscribe  
Notify of